Children

A new Pediatric Respiratory Reviews study conducted in Israel examines issues surrounding children between the ages of five and 11 who are eligible for vaccination against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Herein, the researchers offer a detailed overview of factors that could influence the decision to take or abstain from vaccination. Study: Covid-19
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Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have been collaborating on an extensive heart registry that includes student-athletes in the Big Ten athletic conference, to learn more about cardiac issues in those who have recovered from a COVID-19 infection. The goal is to get a detailed look at the infection’s impact on
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Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have reduced long-term survival rates compared to their peers without cancer. The study also found inferior long-term mortality outcomes persist as far out as three
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Prematurity affects about 10% of pregnancies worldwide each year. In about 20% of very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants, punctate white matter lesions (PWML) can be diagnosed at MRI at term equivalent age. PWML is accompanied by mild impairment in the development of white matter tracts, that can affect both long-term motor and cognitive
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During the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic, the proportion of children and adolescents from low-income families with overweight or obesity increased markedly, according to new research being presented at this year’s European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Maastricht, Netherlands (4-7 May). The study is by Ihuoma Eneli, MD, MS, FAAP, Director of the
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In a recent study published in the journal PLOS One, researchers investigated the early indicators of neurological dysfunctions, including the absence of fidgety movements, in three to five-month-old infants prenatally exposed to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Study: Infants prenatally exposed to SARS-CoV-2 show the absence of fidgety movements and are at higher
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A new study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) today, “Acute Hepatitis and Adenovirus Infection Among Children -; Alabama, October 2021–February 2022” provides additional clinical and epidemiologic information from an ongoing investigation involving children in Alabama with hepatitis (inflammation of the liver) of unknown cause. These findings build on previous information
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In a recent study published in Pediatrics, researchers examined the association between a vegetarian diet and growth, micronutrients, and lipids among healthy children. They also assessed the impact of age and consuming cow milk on these aforementioned associations. Study: Vegetarian Diet, Growth, and Nutrition in Early Childhood: A Longitudinal Cohort Study. Image Credit: Rido/Shutterstock Background
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In a study published in Frontiers in Pediatrics, researchers reviewed the ways to develop breastfeeding practices in the era of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Image Credit: Updating Clinical Practices to Promote and Protect Human Milk and Breastfeeding in a COVID-19 Era. Image Credit: Onjira Leibe/Shutterstock Background Breastfeeding and lactation have been affected by
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CAR-T therapy, a form of immunotherapy that revs up T-cells to recognize and destroy cancer cells, has revolutionized the treatment of blood cancers, including certain leukemias, lymphomas, and most recently, multiple myeloma. However, Black and Hispanic people were largely absent from the major clinical trials that led to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval
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Women’s elevated anxiety, depression and stress during pregnancy altered key features of the fetal brain, which subsequently decreased their offspring’s cognitive development at 18 months. These changes also increased internalizing and dysregulation behaviors, according to a new study by Children’s National Hospital published in JAMA Network Open. Researchers followed a cohort of 97 pregnant women
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Young adults who received organ transplants as children may not be regularly attending their doctor appointments after leaving their pediatric providers. Missing these appointments is associated with longer and more frequent hospitalizations and poorer medication adherence, according to a new study. Researchers at the University of Georgia found a significant decline in attending adult health
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University of Gothenburg The health of residents living alongside a bus route in Gothenburg, Sweden, became considerably better when hybrid buses were replaced by buses fully powered by electricity. Along with the noise levels, a study at the University of Gothenburg shows a reduction in fatigue, daytime sleepiness, and low mood. Image Credit: Wirestock Creators / Shutterstock
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A new study describes the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric primary care mental health visits. Findings from the study will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2022 Meeting, taking place April 21-25 in Denver. Researchers with Boston Children’s Hospital found that visits to pediatric primary care offices for eating disorder and
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A new study reports that selective impairments in regional fetal brain growth predict adverse cognitive, language and motor outcomes in infants with congenital heart disease. Interestingly, larger fetal ventricular volumes were associated with early autistic features. Findings from the study will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2022 Meeting, taking place April 21-25
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A new study demonstrates that intranasal human milk is a safe and feasible intervention for intraventricular hemorrhage, a serious cause of morbidity in preterm infants. Findings from the study will be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies (PAS) 2022 Meeting, taking place April 21-25 in Denver. This is the first prospective trial on safety and
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Abnormalities in a type of brain cell called astrocytes may play a pivotal role in causing some behavioral symptoms of autism spectrum disorders, according to a preclinical study by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators. For the study, published April 1 in Molecular Psychiatry, senior author Dr. Dilek Colak, assistant professor of neuroscience at the Feil Family
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