Children

High-dose folic acid is protective against congenital malformations if the mother is at particular risk of having a child with congenital malformations. Treatment with antiseizure medication in pregnancy is associated with risk of congenital malformations in the children and women with epilepsy are therefore often recommended a supplementary high dose of folic acid (4-5 mg
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Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a type of cancer affecting the mucus-secreting glands of the lower esophagus -; the tube connecting the throat to the stomach. It is the most common form of esophageal cancer and often preceded by Barrett’s metaplasia (BE), a deleterious change in cells lining the esophagus. Though the cause of EAC remains
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UC Riverside engineers are developing low-cost, robotic “clothing” to help children with cerebral palsy gain control over their arm movements. Cerebral palsy is the most common cause of serious physical disability in childhood, and the devices envisioned for this project are meant to offer long-term daily assistance for those living with it. However, traditional robots
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Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a rare disorder that causes neurocognitive and developmental deficits. However, musical and auditory abilities are preserved or even enhanced in WBS patients. Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have identified the mechanism responsible for this ability in models of the disease. The findings were published today in Cell. Understanding what
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Critical Path Institute (C-Path) has announced it will serve as the convener of the Critical Path for Rare Neurodegenerative Diseases (CP-RND), a new public-private partnership (PPP) to benefit people across multiple rare neurodegenerative diseases, supported by a grant from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Agency announced the PPP today in a press
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A groundbreaking study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago determined the threshold for a new measure of early scarring in the esophagus of children with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), which allows immediate intervention during endoscopy to halt further damage and prevent food from getting stuck in the esophagus (feeding tube) of kids
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Researchers from the Epilepsy Neurogenetics Initiative (ENGIN) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) found that across nearly 50,000 visits, patients continued to use telemedicine effectively even with the reopening of outpatient clinics a year after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, prominent barriers for socially vulnerable families and racial and ethnic minorities persist, suggesting
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While the COVID-19 pandemic wanes, the U.S. continues to face a national health challenge – the effective and equitable care of individuals with Long COVID. While the federal government is responding to this condition, few of their undertakings directly address clinical care and the potential of disability compensation. To ensure the effective and equitable care
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Children with certain immunodeficiency diseases carry mutations in genes that regulate the body’s immune system against viral infections and they have a higher mortality rate due to COVID-19. This is according to a study by researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. Most children infected with the
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The COVID-19 pandemic has had many deleterious consequences for health care workers, including the challenges of caring for severely ill patients. Resident physicians, in particular, may have been affected by physical as well as psychological consequences of the pandemic. At present, data are sparse on the perceptions, coping strategies and mental health of residents during
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The first year of the COVID-19 pandemic saw a 113% increase in the “Years of Life Lost” among adolescents and young people in the United States due to unintentional drug overdose, according to researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and College of Medicine. Study findings published online in the Journal of Adolescent
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Prenatal cannabis exposure following the middle of the first trimester—generally after five to six weeks of fetal development—is associated with attention, social, and behavioral problems that persist as the affected children progress into early adolescence (11 and 12 years of age), according to new research supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part
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A growing number of hospitals are outsourcing often-unprofitable outpatient services for their poorest patients by setting up independent, nonprofit organizations to provide primary care. Medicare and Medicaid pay these clinics, known as federally qualified health center look-alikes, significantly more than they would if the sites were owned by hospitals. Like the nearly 1,400 federally qualified
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A recent study on the acceptance of insect food products published in Food and Quality Preference found that certain types of insect products were better liked by Danish children. Study: Acceptance of Insect Foods Among Danish Children: Effects of Information Provision, Food Neophobia, Disgust Sensitivity, and Species on Willingness to Try. Image Credit: Charoen Krung Photography/Shutterstock Background
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Immune cells called group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) play an essential role in establishing tolerance to symbiotic microbes that dwell in the human gastrointestinal tract, according to a study led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine. The discovery, reported Sept. 7 in Nature, illuminates an important aspect of gut health and mucosal immunity—one that
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A treatment to move blood from the umbilical cord into an infant’s body may improve the overall health of newborns classified as non-vigorous—limp, pale and with minimal breathing, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The procedure, known as umbilical cord milking, involves gently squeezing the cord between the thumb and forefinger
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A new study conducted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) RECOVER Pediatric Electronic Health Records (EHR) Cohort and authored by Suchitra Rao, MD, infectious disease specialist at Children’s Hospital Colorado, found that the risk of post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC), or long COVID, in children appears to be lower than what has been
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Many transgender parents with children between one-and-a-half and six years of age hesitate to label their child’s gender identity, according to new research from a team at Penn State and Guilford College. In addition, the results suggest that many children with transgender parents play in ways that conform to gendered societal expectations, while others play
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Several studies have shown that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causal agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, affects children with mild symptoms, unlike older age groups. There is a scarcity of research related to the assessment of durability and strength of antibodies generated in children post-COVID-19.  Study: Analysis of Neutralizing Antibody Levels
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Declines in essential health care utilization during the COVID-19 pandemic in low- and lower-middle-income countries devastatingly impact women and children’s health, according to a new study publishing August 30th in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Tashrik Ahmed of the World Bank, US, and colleagues. In some of the world’s poorest countries, the projected corresponding
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